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Confronting Precarious Work in Asia: Politics and Policies

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Research Program, Population and Health Presents

Confronting Precarious Work in Asia: Politics and Policies

 

Arne L. Kalleberg

Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Thursday, March 6, 2014

12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

John A. Burns Hall, Room 3012 (3rd floor)

 

This talk provides an overview of the range of responses to the spread of precarious work in Asia.  I first summarize what is meant by precarious work (including jobs without security and benefits) and present data on its growth in various Asian countries in recent years.  I then review some of the actions taken by unions and different social movements in response to the spread of precarious work.  I discuss an array of social welfare policies and labor laws that have been enacted by governments to address growing concerns over precarious work and its consequences.  I finally evaluate the prospects for adopting new political and social contracts that might counteract the increase in precarious work.

 

Arne L. Kalleberg is a Kenan Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  He is also a Global Scholar at Chung-Ang University in the Republic of Korea for 2012-2014. He has published more than 120 articles and chapters and eleven books on topics related to the sociology of work, organizations, occupations and industries, labor markets, and social stratification. His most recent book is Good Jobs, Bad Jobs: The Rise of Polarized and Precarious Employment Systems in the United States, 1970s-2000s (Russell Sage Foundation, 2011).  His major current projects include a cross-national study of the causes and consequences of precarious work in a number of Asian countries and the role of community colleges in workforce preparation.  He served as President of the American Sociological Association in 2007-8 and is currently the editor of Social Forces, an International Journal of Social Research.

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