Lelemia = Hawaiian^(Scientist*Engineer)

Just giving a little Hawaiian Style

Public Presentations

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​HE ‘ĀINA WAI: REMEMBERING WATER NARRATIVES OF
WAI‘ANAE KAI

by
Natashja Wahine‘aipōhaku Tong

April 22, 2014
6:00-7:15 pm
LCC Wai‘anae Room 1

For years the Waiʻanae moku has been portrayed as a “wasteland,” and it has been taken for granted that this district has been perpetually void of water. The name “Waiʻanae,” asserts that there were two things (among others) that were important in this ʻāina: wai and ʻanae. So where did all the “wai” in Waiʻanae go? This thesis examines archival and other primary source documents to account for the history of water in the Waiʻanae ahupuaʻa. I demonstrate that Waiʻanae was historically a place of wai and offer a detailed account of critical diversions of water resources in Waiʻanae from the Māhele forward. This thesis argues that at the time of the Māhele, Waiʻanae was a place of wai and that water diversion by the Waianae Company, a sugar plantation, caused streams and many springs to run dry and had adverse affects on kalo cultivation into the 1930s.​

​RECONNECTION TO ANCESTRAL KNOWLEDGE OF LAND WITHIN KAHUKU AHUPUA’A: WAHI PANA, MO’OLELO AND KULEANA ‘ĀINA
by
Raymond Kaimana Estrella
April 25, 2014
12:00-1:00 pm
Kama 202
‘Āina was inhabited, cultivated, nurtured, and cared for by ‘ōiwi. The native people of Hawai’i have​

​ a unique relationship to land and vast amounts of ‘ike [knowledge] within the mo’olelo [stories], wahi pana [celebrated places], and kuleana ‘āina [land awards] of particular areas. An inventory regarding mo’olelo and wahi pana of Kahuku ahupua’a contain historical features, locales, and analysis important in being reconnected to a modern landscape of access limitations and constant cultural effacing. Investigation of kuleana ‘āina through Kingdom of Hawai’i land documents unearthed area based features, crops and types of cultivation as well as historical place names and new ideas concerning land distribution among maka’āinana [commoners] of the 1848 Māhele. Celebration and sharing of ancestral knowledge in relation to land is realized through website building and online accessibility to information.

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