Lelemia = Hawaiian^(Scientist*Engineer)

Just giving a little Hawaiian Style


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Warm Field Clothes “on a shoe string”

I forgot how cold Las Cruces Biological Station is at night. Overall, the station has breathtaking landscapes filled with the second largest collection of palm trees in the world, over 400 species of birds, >140 species of mammals, >140 species of reptiles and amphibians. Coto Brus-San Vito is the nearest large city to the station. Every now and then students and staff can take their time off at the town.

The other day a tree fell. To the right is the Wilson Garden.

The other day a tree fell. To the right is the Wilson Garden.

 

The other day, I went on a quest to find warm field clothes “on a shoe string” to San Vito de Jaba, the nearest town to the station. This quaint town is located in the canton of Coto-Brus. Walking around the town I cam across “Ropa Americana”, the Tico version of Savers. And I couldn’t help but walk-in.

Deals, deals...This is the sound where 10 pieces for 1,000 colones (~$4 USD).

Deals, deals…This is the section where 10 pieces for 1,000 colones (~$4 USD). On the other half of Ropa American, clothes are organized according to type of clothing.

I have to admit that this was by far, one of the best thrift shopping experience ever. Going through all the racks and heaps of clothes, I couldn’t help sing in my head Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’ “Thrift Shop” featuring Wanz. Morale of the story “Hey, you never know what you can find at thrift shops.” All mahalo (thanks) to the lanis (heavens) for the hook-up because Heaven’s knew that I needed some more warm field clothes to protect me from the many elements and dangers of the sometimes unforgiving rainforest. 🙂

Ball'n on a budget:  J-crew blazer: $4 Abercrombie & Fitch Polo: $0.40 Colombia Heavy Warm Jacket: $4 Patagonia Warm Jacket: $4 1 Nike field pants: $4 1 Patagonia field pants: $4 1 Nike warm pants: $4 1 Nike warm pants: $0.40 1 nice rug: $1 2 nice shirts: $0.80 1 Bob Marley Jacket: $4

Ball’n on a budget:
J-crew blazer: $4
Abercrombie & Fitch Polo: $0.40
Colombia Heavy Warm Jacket: $4
Patagonia Warm Jacket: $4
1 Nike field pants: $4
1 Patagonia field pants: $4
1 Nike warm pants: $4
1 Nike warm pants: $0.40
1 nice rug: $1
2 nice shirts: $0.80
1 Bob Marley Jacket: $4


Aole i pau.
Continuara
To be continued…
#BALLINon1BUDGET #CostaRica

 

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Hit the ground “running ’em hard”…

For the past month I have been hitting the ground “running ’em hard” since I landed on the tarmac in Costa Rica. It is with great honor that I am able to participate in the Native American & Pacific Islander Research Experience (NAPIRE for short) Program as a Teaching Assistant.

Zeroth Week
The zeroth week of staff arrival focused on in-country preparation before student arrival after many months of pre-arrival preparation by our coordinators.  The NAPIRE Coordinator and Co-Coordinator are Dr. Barbara Dugelby and Dr. Karin Gastreich, respectively. There are two teaching assistants for the program: Nicole Kenote, an enrolled member of the Menominee Indian Tribe; and myself. Overall, the zeroth week was good but plenty work.

Some highlights of what we did:

Sorting through the inventory seeing what we have and discarding any expired items.

Sorting through the inventory seeing what we have and discarding any expired items.

NAPIRE 2014 Handbook :)

NAPIRE 2014 Handbook 🙂

Shopping for essential program items needed for research in San Jose, CR.

Shopping for essential program items needed for research in San Jose, CR.

 

First Week

The students arrived into San Jose, Costa Rica, the capitol. Nicole and I greeted them all at the airport. They all were really worn out and beat from traveling great distances, some came from the Federal States of Micronesia, Guam, the Hawaiian Islands, Alaska and all-over the continental United States of America. Each student was given a welcome a packet, essential program orientation literature, and a customized lanyard name-tag.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014 was the formal start of the NAPIRE program. We took the students to the Costa Rican Office headquarters of the Organization of Tropical Studies, known colloquially as “CRO” for short. Dr. Pia Paaby, the OTS Director of Education, and Administrative Assistant, Kattia Mendez formally welcome the NAPIRE 2014 students into the OTS familia (ohana/family). Lots of the students were still jet-lagged but very excited to be at CRO and learn more about OTS and how NAPIRE came into existence.

NAPIRE 2014 students and staff in front of the "CRO", the Organization of Tropical Studies Headquarters

NAPIRE 2014 students and staff in front of the “CRO”, the Organization of Tropical Studies Headquarters

This years students mark the 10th cohort of NAPIRE students. The first bunch of NAPIRE students came to Costa Rica in 2005.  Since then Native American, Pacific Islander and students from other underrepresented groups have been coming to Costa Rica for educational and research training in tropical biology and ecology.

Dr. Pia Paaby, OTS Director of Education, welcoming and giving an orientation to NAPIRE 2014 students.

Dr. Pia Paaby, OTS Director of Education, welcoming and giving an orientation to NAPIRE 2014 students.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014 was the formal start of the NAPIRE program. We took the students to the Costa Rican Office headquarters of the Organization of Tropical Studies, known colloquially as “CRO” for short. Dr. Pia Paaby, the OTS Director of Education, and Administrative Assistant, Kattia Mendez formally welcome the NAPIRE 2014 students into the OTS familia (ohana/family). Lots of the students were still jet-lagged but very excited to be at CRO and learn more about OTS and how NAPIRE came into existence.

Founded in 1963 by seven founding members, OTS formed as a house of learning with the aim “to provide leadership in education, research, and the responsible use of natural resources in the tropics.” Today, the organization has grown to over 50 OTS member institutions and partnerships. Palo Verde, La Selva, and Las Cruces Biological Stations make up the three main active sites and OTS houses of learning. The main administrative offices of OTS are housed in San Jose, the capitol of Costa Rica.

More about the first week of our adventures can be read at: < http://napire.tumblr.com/#&gt;

Stay tuned for more updates.

Aole i pau.