Lelemia = Hawaiian^(Scientist*Engineer)

Just giving a little Hawaiian Style

Hit the ground “running ’em hard”…

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For the past month I have been hitting the ground “running ’em hard” since I landed on the tarmac in Costa Rica. It is with great honor that I am able to participate in the Native American & Pacific Islander Research Experience (NAPIRE for short) Program as a Teaching Assistant.

Zeroth Week
The zeroth week of staff arrival focused on in-country preparation before student arrival after many months of pre-arrival preparation by our coordinators.  The NAPIRE Coordinator and Co-Coordinator are Dr. Barbara Dugelby and Dr. Karin Gastreich, respectively. There are two teaching assistants for the program: Nicole Kenote, an enrolled member of the Menominee Indian Tribe; and myself. Overall, the zeroth week was good but plenty work.

Some highlights of what we did:

Sorting through the inventory seeing what we have and discarding any expired items.

Sorting through the inventory seeing what we have and discarding any expired items.

NAPIRE 2014 Handbook :)

NAPIRE 2014 Handbook 🙂

Shopping for essential program items needed for research in San Jose, CR.

Shopping for essential program items needed for research in San Jose, CR.

 

First Week

The students arrived into San Jose, Costa Rica, the capitol. Nicole and I greeted them all at the airport. They all were really worn out and beat from traveling great distances, some came from the Federal States of Micronesia, Guam, the Hawaiian Islands, Alaska and all-over the continental United States of America. Each student was given a welcome a packet, essential program orientation literature, and a customized lanyard name-tag.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014 was the formal start of the NAPIRE program. We took the students to the Costa Rican Office headquarters of the Organization of Tropical Studies, known colloquially as “CRO” for short. Dr. Pia Paaby, the OTS Director of Education, and Administrative Assistant, Kattia Mendez formally welcome the NAPIRE 2014 students into the OTS familia (ohana/family). Lots of the students were still jet-lagged but very excited to be at CRO and learn more about OTS and how NAPIRE came into existence.

NAPIRE 2014 students and staff in front of the "CRO", the Organization of Tropical Studies Headquarters

NAPIRE 2014 students and staff in front of the “CRO”, the Organization of Tropical Studies Headquarters

This years students mark the 10th cohort of NAPIRE students. The first bunch of NAPIRE students came to Costa Rica in 2005.  Since then Native American, Pacific Islander and students from other underrepresented groups have been coming to Costa Rica for educational and research training in tropical biology and ecology.

Dr. Pia Paaby, OTS Director of Education, welcoming and giving an orientation to NAPIRE 2014 students.

Dr. Pia Paaby, OTS Director of Education, welcoming and giving an orientation to NAPIRE 2014 students.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014 was the formal start of the NAPIRE program. We took the students to the Costa Rican Office headquarters of the Organization of Tropical Studies, known colloquially as “CRO” for short. Dr. Pia Paaby, the OTS Director of Education, and Administrative Assistant, Kattia Mendez formally welcome the NAPIRE 2014 students into the OTS familia (ohana/family). Lots of the students were still jet-lagged but very excited to be at CRO and learn more about OTS and how NAPIRE came into existence.

Founded in 1963 by seven founding members, OTS formed as a house of learning with the aim “to provide leadership in education, research, and the responsible use of natural resources in the tropics.” Today, the organization has grown to over 50 OTS member institutions and partnerships. Palo Verde, La Selva, and Las Cruces Biological Stations make up the three main active sites and OTS houses of learning. The main administrative offices of OTS are housed in San Jose, the capitol of Costa Rica.

More about the first week of our adventures can be read at: < http://napire.tumblr.com/#&gt;

Stay tuned for more updates.

Aole i pau.

 

 

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